Monday, September 14, 2009

Simple, Bold, and Unforgettable


Fuzzy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Focused . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sharpening the focus helps listeners understand the idea.

We already know that great speeches—effective speeches—convey a powerful idea expressed as a
simple, bold, and unforgettable thesis statement. You begin with a topic of interest. Then you sharpen the focus by asking, "What, exactly, do I want to say about this topic?" Hopefully, what you want to say about the topic is in the form of a great idea. You then state that idea in one simple, bold, unforgettable sentence, your thesis statement.

Let's try an example. Your topic is video game violence. The great idea you want to express is violence begets violence. Video games are just one example of that idea, but if your listeners grasp that idea, it will steer them away from violent video games as well as other kinds of violence. So, you choose as your thesis this simple, bold, and unforgettable sentence, "Violent video games result in violent behavior." Then you go about the task of finding solid support to show that playing violent video games does in deed lead to violent behavior.

Learning Activity

1. You have been assigned to speak about the topic Competition.

2. What, exactly, do you want to say about competition? (Does what you want to say meet the acid test for ideas?)

3. Write a thesis statement about competition and share it in the comment section.

© Frank Richardson, 2009.

email: swpubs@xmission.com


1 comment:

  1. Without competition there would be no progression.

    ReplyDelete